What is Motion JPEG 2000?

You’ve seen the technology in use with many AV over IP video systems, but what exactly is Motion JPEG 2000?

We’re familiar with JPEG images, found all over on the Web and on our phones and tablets. JPEG was created in 1992 by the Joint Photographic Experts Group, who followed up with JPEG 2000 in Y2K. As a new standard, it was glorious. Also known as JP2, advanced wavelet encoding could save images in a lossless or lossy version. While JP2 offered improved performance, it never gained acceptance – the difference wasn’t enough to challenge the popularity of JPEG.



ve seen the technology in use for many AV over IP video systems, but what exactly is Motion JPEG 2000?

You’ve seen JPEG images, found all over on the Web and on your cell phone. JPEG was created in 1992 by the Joint Photographic Experts Group, who followed up with JPEG 2000 in Y2K. As a new standard, it was glorious. Also known as JP2, advanced wavelet encoding can save the images in a lossless or lossy version. While JP2 offered improved performance, it never gained acceptance – the difference wasn’t enough to challenge the popularity of JPEG.

Going Into Motion

Acceptance was much improved when the group upgraded the legacy Motion JPEG to use JP2 technology. A Motion JPEG 2000 video stream is composed of a series of JP2 images at 24, 30, or 60 frames per second. The first adopters were archivists like the Smithsonian, who discovered they could compress videos at a 3:1 ratio without losing original quality. Video editors preferred MJP2 over MPEG, because it was easy to cut between individual frames. When you go to a digital movie theater, you’re watching a high-end version of MJP2.

Adoption for network streaming was a different story, as MJP2 streams are massive, and MPEG H.264 performs better for highly compressed streams. However, with the advent of dedicated AV 1G/10G networks, MJP2 has found a new life for AV over IP, as:

  • Video can switch between frames, assuring zero latency
  • Compression shrinks bandwidth to fit the network – 3:1 compression for 10G, 20:1 compression for 1G networks
  • The codec is free, with zero royalties

Motion JPEG 2000 by Any Other Name

Some products will list MJP2 by name, others may use the codec under a brand name, and some use a variant of MJP2. I suspect branded codecs are really Motion JPEG 2000 – what vendor would invest a million or so for a new codec that works the same as the free codec?

  • Crestron NVX Pixel Perfect – MJP2 with tweaked settings
  • Extron PURE3 – it’s not a patent, but a trademark for sending compressed streams (likely MJP2), audio and control through a network
  • SVDoE – “Proprietary” but compression ratios like MJP2
  • Atlona VC-2 – Britain’s BBC’s Dirac codec is similar to MPEG but uses JP2 instead of JPEG for the I-frame in the GOP. Dirac Pro (SMPTE VP-2), designed for broadcast production, can handle 4-8K video and encode video with only I-frames, essentially the same as MJP2.