Audinate Drops the InfoComm Bomb – Dante Now Routes 4K Video as well as Audio

A small one-paragraph blurb in the InfoComm 2018 Show Daily is the biggest story of the show – Audinate announces Dante AV. A perfectly timed article, “Making the Case for AV-0ver-IP,” in the June 2019 Sound & Communication magazine, written by Audinate’s Brad Price, reveals a bigger picture. 

The short story is this – Dante AV accepts up to 4K60 4:4:4 10-bit video and 8 audio tracks, routing AV streams over 1G IP as easily as Dante audio, all in sync with a master clock. Audinate makes the new Dante AV interface that’s inside, and other vendors add Motion JPEG 2000 encoding/decoding as well as pass-through RS-232 and IR. Network routing, discovery, master clock, and control is handled by Dante, with assured interoperability between suppliers’ transceivers. 

The bigger vision for the new innovation is presented with clarity in the article, written before Dante AV was revealed at the show. AV-over-IP has great potential, but as in the early days of network audio, manufacturers have created a mish-mosh of choice, an irregular, branded mix of codecs, networking schemes, control commands and proprietary features. Pixel Perfect vs PURE3? What does that even mean?

For the AV-over-IP to grow, a consistent standard is required. To meet the needs of both the AV and IP communities,  a standard must be set that answers requirements for security, scalability, interoperability, performance, and market adoption. An ecosystem made of many partners offers more options than domination by one brand, or niches owned by a few. 

For many reasons, AV-via-Dante can be a strong foundation for that ecosystem. After all, they did emerge as the defacto standard for IP audio – why not AV? 

Crestron is the market leader for many good reasons, but Dante-friendly Q-Sys programming is quickly gaining ground. Other major players will arise shortly – Yamaha is already an Audinate AV partner, with products in development. As Crestron plays well with other standards, they could incorporate Dante AV as well. 

However all this plays out, Dante AV should open the door to new innovation in AV-over-IP!

Video in Transition- Hauling a 4K load Over a 1080p Bridge

New technology brings new challenges and solutions in AV design

The transition from 3:4 analog to 16:9 digital HD was reasonably painless. For meeting rooms and living rooms, HD screens had had little impact on room design – they were about as tall as 3:4 screens, with more horizontal real estate.

Converting analog video to HD was a greater challenge for twisted-pair video distribution. “Video Voodoo” problems arose as the precise kind of wire twist affected distance, resolution and performance. Those problems faded away with the introduction of HDBaseT, a chipset that converted digital video into packets. Think of HDBaseT UTP cable as an 8G bridge, easily transporting 3G 1080p video, audio, control data and Ethernet for up to 300 feet.

Enter 4K, an easy step for TV vendors, not so easy for twisted-pair video. That 8G bridge now has to carry a 10-16G load, more with 4:4:4 color and 10-bit HDR. Not happening, so something has to change – lighten the load, strengthen the bridge, or a bit of both.

Building the Bridge with PAM

PAM stands for Pulse-Amplitude Modulation, that expresses data using amplitude in a series of signals. PAM-5, used by 1G Ethernet uses values of -2, -1,0,+1 and +2 VDC to represent bits of data. Each of the four twisted pairs carry up to 125 mbps, summing up to 1G of data. 10G Ethernet, both HDBaseT and IP Switching, employs PAM-16, encoding 16 levels with added physics. The limiting factor in PAM technology is RF noise, as it prevents the receiver from sensing the right levels. This is a key factor in 10G Ethernet, as the level steps are much smaller. For this reason, shielded cable should be used for all 10G applications. 2.5G/5G Ethernet uses a lighter version of PAM-16 designed for Cat 5e/6 UTP applications. Of course, optical fiber is always the best carrier, as there is no RF noise to interfere with the signal.

It’s interesting to note that AV platforms we view as different – AV over IP, QAM digital cable, 8-VSB off-air digital channels, and HDBaseT – are all based on variations of PAM technology.

Compression – Lightening the Load

Full 18G 4K60 HDR video can’t travel over a 10G bridge, so the stream has to be compressed to fit. There are two technologies in use today:

  • VESA Display Stream Compression (DSC) in newer HDBaseT systems, creates a visually lossless stream, typically at a 3:1 ratio, reducing an 18G 4K60 HDR stream to 6G with little loss in quality. Examples include Crestron DM 4KZ and WyreStorm 18G HDBaseT systems.
  • Motion JPEG 2000 was designed for video storage, reducing files by 3:1 without losing original quality. With today’s higher bandwidth, the codec has a new application in AV over IP technology:
    • 10G IP Switching. Employs 3:1 compression to deliver mathematically lossless video. In use today in SVDoE and Extron systems.
    • 1G IP Switching. Employs 20:1 compression to deliver visually lossless streams over 1G Ethernet networks. Available from Crestron, WyreStorm, Extron, Kramer and many others.

VESA DSC has a key advantage – compression only affects streams starting at 4K60 4:4:4, other streams are uncompressed.

The good news is there are solutions in place for the challenges in 4K video distribution.

  • Sites with existing Cat 5e/6 UTP wiring can transport 4K video using 1G IP switching gear, and companies like WyreStorm and others have HDBaseT extenders that can transport 4K video over Cat 6, with some resolution and distance limitations.
  • New installations have many options for 4K distribution over Cat 6a/7a STP cable or fiber.

4K over H.264? 4 Sure – and More!

As consumers who binge hundreds of video streams from cable, DirecTV, Netflix, Amazon Prime and other services – we assume that the MPEG H.264 streams we’re watching are limited to 1080p. Surprise! Those clever cooks at MPEG LA (the entity that collects MPEG fees and royalties) always had a lot more in mind. The fact is, H.264 can crunch 4K and 8K video just as easily as 1080p!

The catch is, the streams would be much bigger, way to big to travel over the average network and WiFi. So about 95% of the content you watch at home is H.264-driven 1080p. 4K streams are encoded with HEVC H.265 or Google’s VP9 or AVI technology (all You Tube content is VP9 format) – all able to scrunch the 4K stream into a size closer to 1080p dimensions.

That’s fine for 4K programming in the home, where billion-dollar technology makes it possible to send content to $30 dongles. The math is different in the commercial world, where we need moderately-priced encoders to send in-house content and signage to lobby. lunchroom, classroom, and meeting room TVs.

While 4K H.264 streams are too big for home distribution, they’re fine for dedicated commercial media networks.

About That Spinning Wheel…

Remember the spinning wheel of Netflix that tried our patience in the days of 1.5 M Internet? That’s caused by buffering – the streaming box has to pull in a number of frames into memory so it can figure out how to decode the video. Not a big problem these days, but H.264 (and HEVC/VP9 and so on) will always need buffering time. The encoding format is called Inter-Frame, so called because the stream is made up of Groups of Pictures. Each group starts with an actual picture called the I frame, essentially a JPEG. The rest of the “pictures” are just data that describe what stayed the same, what moved and what colors changed. That keeps the streams small. The decoder does the same in reverse, grabbing the first picture in the group, then storing a few more data frames, then “reading” the information to reconstruct the original video.

As consumers, we’re used to that delay, happy to trade off a little time to see a great video. If you’re giving a presentation in a conference room, you want zero delay, or a close to zero as possible. So you wouldn’t want H.264 streams – or so you thought.

Those clever H.264 gnomes had a solution, called H.264-Intra. Instead of encoding groups of pictures and data, Intra creates a stream made of individual I-Frames, compressed images. For our AV Geek readers, this is similar to Motion JPEG 2000, used in many IP video switching systems. It’s great for fast switching, as the decoder doesn’t have to buffer frames and calculate, it simply uncompresses each frame as they arrive.

An H.264-Intra decoder in a presentation room context could be the best of both worlds, able to quickly switch between Intra-generated content, but also able to playback standard Inter-frame content as well.

The Catch Is….

An existing MPEG decoder likely isn’t expecting to process 4K or intra-frame content. It’s a forgivable oversight. Vendors thought like consumers and didn’t realize that other options are part of the H.264 standard and have value for commercial applications.

But it’s an interesting concept – a more universal streaming format for presentation and distribution content, Is it better? Haven’t seen a live demonstration as yet. Is it zero latency? Of course, nothing is zero – any amount of processing adds delay, so that’s a “we’ll see” as well. Another benefit is that MPEG supports captioning data for ADA requirements – presentation codecs like Motion JPEG 2000 don’t support that.

 

 

AV Over IP – A Primer

AVoverIP

AV Over IP is the term for technology that delivers audio visual content over Ethernet. The term also implies that content traditionally sent or switched over analog or digital switching now employs IP packets and standard Ethernet switches between the source and destination.

There are two basic AVoIP applications, Distribution and Presentation.

Distributed IP Delivery

  • Content is distributed over a large area
  • Endpoints described as encoders and decoders
  • Usually a high ratio of decoders to encoders
  • Streams are highly compressed to save network bandwidth
  • Half- to 1-second latency is acceptable, depending on application
  • Streams can provide captioning data and audio sync

Distributed content is sent over large areas, including nationwide through Netflix or over a single site from cable channels, modulated over RF coax, or via an IP network. Due the larger scale of distribution, streams should be as small as possible, able to carry ADA captioning, and don’t require instant switching for viewing. The standard format for this application is MPEG, usually MPEG2 for off-air TV and in-house RF channels, and H.264 for commercial and consumer IP-based TV.

MPEG is designed for maximum compression – H.264 can easily compress a 3Gbps (bits per second) 1080p video to a 15 mbps stream, a 200:1 ratio, and consumer streams are compressed far more. The secret sauce is called the GOP, the Group of Pictures, and only the first frame is an actual image. MPEG compresses the first frame into an image similar to a JPEG. The encoder then captures a few more frames and notes objects that move or change color, and saves just that data. This is called inter-frame encoding, as the encoder is continually cross-referencing frames. When a decoder changes a stream, it has to capture the first several frames in the next GOP and rebuild the video back to its original content. This deconstruction/reconstruction process takes time, creating about a half- to one-second delay. That’s why you experience a pause when changing MPEG channels.

Presentation IP Delivery

  • Displayed in a defined area
  • Endpoints described as transmitters and receivers 
  • Simpler to define and expand input/output configurations
  • Large streams require a dedicated IP network
  • Instant switching, about 2-4 frames
  • Streams composed of images and audio tracks, no captioning data

When a system is delivering a live presentation or event, the content on the video screens must to be in sync with what’s on the stage or podium, and cameras need to be changed instantly. Visible latency is disconcerting to the presenter and audience. This is the traditional application for AV switching systems.

The new counterpart to AV Switching is routing content over an IP network. Instead of a central switch with multi-port input and output cards, designers can define any number of individual transmitters and receivers, routed through a standard Ethernet switch.  Video frames are converted to stream packets using Motion JPEG 2000, typically compressed to 3:1 to 20:1 ratios. As the stream consists of individual images, switching is fast, with little latency. 

However, latency is a bit looser than AV’s vertical-interval switching. IP guarantees delivery, but there is no central clock to lock down timing, so there are network variables that could affect latency. As with AV switching extensive scaling at the input and output points can affect latency as well. As there is not sync data as there is in MPEG, audio could be behind – or ahead of the video, especially if the video is highly compressed and scaled and the audio just passed through. I would imagine some IP systems offer settings to minimize audio timing issues. 

What is the Effect of 4K video on commerical IP distribution systems?

For commercial systems, 4K is more of a marketing pitch than a reality. Current room and screen designs can’t take advantage of 4K, and very little content will be 4K for some time. It just isn’t needed. 

MPEG distribution technology is typically limited to 1080p. However, H.264 does support 4K and “zero latency“. For the present, 4K codecs such as HEVC (H.265) and VP9/AV1 aren’t usable for commercial applications.